What-does-doing-it-all

I’m a podcast junkie. Now that my girls are mobile and extremely active, I have less time to sit more than a couple of minutes at a time. I used to joke about how little television that I watched even though it’s on ALL.THE.TIME. Now, it’s truly a reality. I’d be lucky if I see or hear more than a scene in a show. In the beginning, I used to rewind it, until I realized that I would spend almost an entire day rewinding a television show to see what I missed. If you can’t tell, the DVR is my friend.

Anyway, I’ve been on the podcast bandwagon for over six years, mainly listening to Adam Carolla and the shows on his network. Then I was introduced to Watch What Crappens (a hilarious review of all Bravo shows ~ hey, if I can’t watch them, I can listen to people talk about them, right?). As these episodes only covered a couple of hours a day (at MOST), I figured I should actually try listening to something productive, instead of just a replacement for my junk television watching.

That led me to listening to Lose the Cape and Beyond Your Blog. But these only post once a week! What am I going to do for the other 6 days a week?

I loved podcasts so much that I even started my own: Run Your World!

I’ve tried a lot of shows, many I did not like, but one that caught my attention was one called Atomic Moms. Most of all, this episode struck a chord with me, and I thought it would strike one with you as well.

The guest was Clare Kramer, founder of Geek Nation. She’s a mom of four and runs a multi-million dollar multimedia corporation. In response to how she works her day and manage to get it all in, she said something to the effect of “I subscribe to the notion that women can do it all. Since I believe that, I just do that.”

Say what? Because you believe it, you can achieve it. Just like that.

I didn’t buy it.

I still don’t.

As I listened to her tell her story about her lengthy day, rising early, going to sleep late, she mentioned all of the great things she manages to do every day. They watch television together every night, and on weekends, they have family time. Without a maid, she cleans everything herself. As the boss, she’s able to schedule her meetings and responsibilities around her family’s activity times.

Sounds awesome.

Except, I’m not a boss. I don’t get to choose when a meeting is held and they will happily host a meeting without me, and let me know how I’m slacking on my duties.

Also, she doesn’t take vacation time or date night with her husband… everything is focused around the family. I don’t know what that means for intimate time.

Her house is often messy because she cannot be there to clean it all.

This is not a post about judging her. According to her, she does it all.

But what it made me realize is… What does doing it all mean to me?

As moms, we spend so much time comparing ourselves to others, thinking they manage to get so many more things done. They may, they may not. The important thing is are we getting done what we want to get done.

Does it mean having a career and having the perfect home? Does it mean being there for my children and work responsibilities all of the time?

Or does it mean that I will do the best I can every day and make every day a priority to choose what makes sense to me?

As a stay at home mom that volunteers frequently and runs her own blog, I make an assessment everyday to make the best of the day. Some days, it means a clean house and sit down dinner on the table at six. Other days, it means my head is buried in the computer between activities with the kids, with pizza for dinner and going to bed late.

Overall, although I don’t think I “do it all”, I know I do what’s best for me and my family. And I’m happy with that.

Are you?

~ April

We operate on the philosophy that we all do the best we can for what works for us and our family. We invite you to #LoseTheCape with us!

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